Loading...

“Who is our brother? Who is our sister?”

2013-04-03T12:48:45+00:00

Homily at the Good Friday “Service of the Passion” (Excerpt)
by Aloysious Mowe SJ
 
DSC03855 - Version 3
 
We are prone to putting others on trial, making them wait for our judgment. I suspect that religious people can be more prone to do this than those who are not religious.

“Those whose faith is not the same as ours; or those whose sexuality we cannot, or refuse, to understand; we sit in judgment, do we not? We put them on trial, and we condemn them to shame, or exclusion.”

When the High Priest and then Pilate put Jesus on trial, they think they are sitting in judgment over Jesus; what they do not realise is that they open themselves up to judgment instead. The High Priest, who of all people should have known what the Messiah would be like, cannot recognise him. He has the words, the theology, the religious feelings – but in his power and religious certainty he has set up a barrier between himself and God.

Pilate’s interrogation of Jesus is all about power, and territory, kingship, and kingdoms, and the use of violence to defend power. That there is another way of living, of seeking and living according to the truth, whatever the cost, makes no sense to him.

We evaluate, sift, one another all the time: and yet we are the ones on trial when we do this. At his trial and in his Passion, Jesus encounters at every level the hostility of others, the hostility of the world.

“Any refugee, any person different from the community by reason of race, sexuality, or gender, knows what it is to feel this hostility. We are called to be bearers not of hostility, but of hospitality, the hospitality of God, whatever the cost may be.”

Last night in a juvenile prison in Rome, Pope Francis washed the feet of twelve young offenders. He became the first Pope to wash the feet of women; and among the twelve, there was also two Muslims.

Each of us should ask, what part of our consciousness, our sense of whom we are, of what Church should be, is called into question by this.

“Who is our brother? Who is our sister?”

I think the Pope’s actions put us on trial, challenges our securities.

Everything is taken away from Jesus at his trial and Passion.

“Can we take the risk and abandon everything that keeps us peaceful, secure and safe and certain, so that we can encounter, naked, the one who loves us?”

 

Click on arrow to play YouTube VIDEO of Good Friday at St Canice’s – 1 min 40 secs

 

 
DSC03863
 
DSC03854
 
DSC03855
 
Pope Francis kisses the foot of a prisoner at Casal del Marmo youth prison in Rome

4 Comments

  1. Mark July 2, 2013 at 10:19 am - Reply

    “Those whose faith is not the same as ours; or those whose sexuality we cannot, or refuse, to understand; we sit in judgment, do we not? We put them on trial, and we condemn them to shame, or exclusion.”“Who is our brother? Who is our sister?” “Any refugee, any person different from the community by reason of race, sexuality, or gender, knows what it is to feel this hostility. We are called to be bearers not of hostility, but of hospitality, the hospitality of God, whatever the cost may be.” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D2drzZ4IotA

    • mmus July 4, 2013 at 9:31 am - Reply

      Thank you, Mark. I believe Father Aloysious was also reinforcing the imperative that we extend hospitality and and accept all persons without judgment.

      • Mark July 4, 2013 at 8:16 pm - Reply

        It is all very well to dress in red- as many priests do, but to live the wounds of Christ, as many TG people live – without being offered a sincere helping hand, from a Christian community, is all together another story. As I have not found any helpful links in regards to help being offered to TG people in Sydney, on this web thus far, I am wondering if restoring serenity, self respect, faith in God and human kindness in the most vulnerable in our society, is truly at the heart of your community? Providing advice, by posting helpful Christian links on your site, in regards to employment- health and other, would enable TG people -to feel embraced by Him, embrace the Christ you preach we must embrace, and perhaps one day feel comfortable enough to join you at the Eucharistic table. The words ‘brothers’ and ‘sisters’ mean nothing unless the most vulnerable in our society are loved as such. Moreover, words such as ‘hospitality’ and ‘acceptance’ should nowadays be replaced with ‘unconditional love’ and ‘ a profound desire to sincerely help’. As the most vulnerable, including TG people in society, are too shy to ask for this deep form of love and much needed help.

        • mmus August 26, 2013 at 5:26 pm - Reply

          Dear MArk, At St Canice’s we embrace and welcome all, and invite you to join us at any time for our celebration of the Eucharist.

Leave A Comment